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The APMA House of Delegates Meet in DC, Elects Seth Rubenstein, DPM as new VP

This year’s 98th House of Delegates meeting of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) in Washington, DC convened to vote on new officials of the House, the Board, and to plan and implement procedures and policies that will assist the advancement of podiatric medicine. Dr. Seth Rubenstein who previously served as the Treasurer, was elected as the Vice President of the APMA's House of Delegates. The House of Delegates is the body of the APMA. Its purpose is to provide fair representation of the interests of podiatrists across the country and make policy recommendations to the Board. A separate Legislative Conference follows the House of Delegates to lobby Congress on issues of importance to podiatry and their patients. Drs. Michael Tritto, Todd Harrison, and Andrew Liss serve as the Maryland delegates of the APMA and Dr. Erika Schwartz represents us as the Washington, DC delegate. Dr. Tritto also serves as the Chair of the Resolutions Committee. The Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic made a $25,000 contribution to the APMA’s Educational Foundation to establish a named endowment. The fund is dedicated to advancing and growing podiatric medicine through student scholarships, projects, and activities. This particular endowment will create a continuous $1,000 annual student scholarship for a 3rd or 4th year podiatric medical student. [caption id="attachment_2207" align="aligncenter" width="800"] FASMA doctors Seth Rubenstein, Todd Harrison, Michael Tritto, Gene Mirkin, and David Freedman give a $25,000 check to the APMA Educational Foundation[/caption] After the weekend’s activities concluded, Dr. Rubenstein continued his work in advancing podiatric interests. He, along with student doctors, lobbied Congress on Tuesday to ensure support and representation of podiatrists in the VA Provider Equity Act (HR 1058/S1871). [caption id="attachment_2206" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Student doctors Milad Kashani (left) and Chris Dreikorn (right), and the newly elected Vice President of the APMA, Dr. Seth Rubenstein lobby Congress in Washington, DC.[/caption] FASMA would like to congratulate all of the newly elected doctors and delegates, including our own Seth Rubenstein, DPM, and extend our gratitude to all members of the APMA’s House of Delegates who work tirelessly on the behalf of all podiatrists.

The Importance of a Multidisciplinary Approach

 
Dr. Alyssa Carroll Podiatrist Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic Dr. Alyssa Carroll in the operating room during her residency at Christiana Care Health System in Wilmington, DE.
In the new era of medicine a multidisciplinary, or team, approach is not only becoming the new norm, but it is also becoming more and more important. By definition, we as specialists are experts in our field. In the case of the foot and ankle, we pride ourselves in the knowledge of our respective area; we also rely on others to complete the clinical picture for many of our patients. Let’s take a look at how multidisciplinary approach affects you, as the patient. A diabetic foot ulcer is like an iceberg floating in the ocean. The casual observer sees a small, benign piece of ice, while underneath lurks a sizable structure that will require many hands to study and effectively conquer it. All diabetics have related neurologic, metabolic, vascular and podiatric issues that benefit from a multidisciplinary team of specialist doctors. One patient may require as many as six to seven specialists to keep their disease controlled. The list includes, but is not limited to: primary care, endocrinology, podiatry, nutrition, neurology, infectious disease, vascular, and pedorthist. These fields must meld together in a team approach to give the patient the best care. In a hospital setting, a multidisciplinary network is usually built in, and consults between specialties is a relatively streamlined process. However, in the outpatient setting it certainly can be more difficult. With electronic medical records (EMR) and other technological advances, this should hopefully become more efficient. However, it is still extremely important for us as this patient’s podiatrist to call on our colleagues of different expertise to ensure the disease in question is tackled from all angles. Your podiatrist and other providers work diligently to build a good repertoire with clinical providers in your local community to develop a team atmosphere. We know the important role physical therapy and other ancillary healthcare providers play. Many of our podiatry patients benefit from their services, so we try and get to know these providers in the area. The more providers that we know, the greater the opportunity to work with other providers in tandem to give exceptional care to our patients.  
Dr. Alyssa Carroll practices casting on her colleague.
Dr. Alyssa Carroll assists her colleagues in casting.
We stay engaged with these connections in order to benefit our patients and have more tools in the toolbox. The multidisciplinary approach affords a wealth of knowledge and resources for the patient.  After all, as a podiatrist, there is no better feeling than being able to look assuredly at our patients and lay out a plan to get you well. Dr. Alyssa Carroll  is the newest doctor of the Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic and works in the Raleigh, NC (Millbrook) office. The information on this site is provided for your assistance only; this site does not provide podiatric advice. You should never diagnose or treat yourself for a podiatric condition based on the information provided herein, and the information is not provided for that purpose. Likewise, you should never determine that treatment is unnecessary based on this information. The information contained herein is not a substitute for podiatric care provided by a licensed podiatric professional. The information provided herein is not podiatric, medical or professional advice. This site does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Dr. Alyssa Carroll and Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, related to any products offered for sale on this web site. Dr. Alyssa Carroll and Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC further expressly disclaims any product warranties of effectiveness or fitness for any particular purpose or use. You are solely responsible for your use of, or reliance on, any products offered for sale herein, and any consequences arising out of such use or reliance. In no event will Dr. Alyssa Carroll and Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC be liable for any damages resulting from use of or reliance on any such products, whether based on warranty, contract, tort or any other legal theory. This website, and the information contained herein, is provided to you as a service for use at your sole risk.

New Doctors in Annapolis

Our podiatry office in Annapolis, MD added experienced doctors and podiatric expertise to better serve your area. We’re happy to introduce three new faces who hold over 90 years of combined experience. Dr. Gina Saffo Dr. Gene Mirkin Dr. Todd Harrison Podiatrists

Dr. Gina Saffo is a Diplomate of the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery, a member of the American Podiatric Medical Association, past Secretary and current member of the Maryland Podiatric Medical Association, and past President and current member of the American Association for Women Podiatrists.

Dr. Gene Mirkin serves as the President of the Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic and was voted among his peers as one of America’s most influential podiatrists. He was on the Executive Board and a member of the Maryland Podiatric Medical Association, and has served the State Medical Society as Treasurer and Secretary. Dr. Mirkin is double Board Certified, in Foot Surgery, as a Diplomate of the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery and, in Podiatric Medicine, by the American Board of Podiatric Medicine. Dr. Todd Harrison is a Diplomate of the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery, a Fellow of the American Society of Podiatric Surgeons, and a member of the following organizations: the Maryland Podiatric Medical Association, the American Podiatric Medical Association, the Alumni Association of the Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine, and the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine. He was appointed to the Maryland Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners in 2012.

During this transition, Dr. Korves will continue to see patients. See the links from our website for more detailed information about each new doctor and their Annapolis hours.

Injury Prevention Made Easy

Next week is Patient Safety Awareness Week. Here are some easy tips for the home, office, and gym to keep you from needing emergency podiatric care. Preventing Home Injuries The most common home injuries are centered around being barefoot, so always wear shoes. This is especially true for diabetic patients. The most frequent home injuries come from stepping on things like a Lego or a piece of glass or stubbing your toe on something. If you spend a lot of time barefoot on hardwood floors instead of soft carpet, you can trigger plantar fasciitis pain (ligament pain in the bottom of your heel). If you’re running around the house in socks, there’s the slip risk factor. We see a lot of bad ankle sprains and fractures because people miss the bottom couple of stairs and end up slipping and falling. Bottom line: shoes in the home are important. If you have an aversion to wearing shoes inside for cleanliness reasons, get an indoor house shoe or slipper. Keep in mind, there’s a big difference between having slippers that are flimsy, floppy and not providing any support versus what’s a little bit bigger and more protective. Home shoes can include a pair of house sneakers or comfy, supportive slippers like Vionics.   Preventing Work Injuries A lot of people see me for general foot pain from choosing the wrong shoes at work, because they’re more worried about looking professional as opposed to finding shoes that really support their feet. An option other than high heels for workplace footwear are shoes that have a bit of a wedge, but are still really supportive and not constricting on the feet. Custom orthotics can be made to make small shoes, even high heels, more comfortable than they are now, because they put special padding in certain places. As podiatrists, we move a lot people out of heels and into flats, because flats can still be fashionable and give you the support you need in the right places with a good custom insert.
 
Dr. Jordan Meyers Podiatrist Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic Dr. Jordan Meyers and his family stay active at the beach.
Keeping Kids Safe At our practice we see a lot kids who have foot injuries because they didn’t wear shoes in the home or yard. Another issue is parents don’t like to buy thick, expensive shoes for kids because they grow out of them fast, but sometimes the flimsy, floppy shoes put extra stress and strain on their feet. Kids’ feet are always so active that flimsy shoes can trigger growth plate irritations that cause pain. Plenty of times parents neglect these injuries because we think our kids are making a big deal about nothing, and sometimes it’s difficult to know the difference between a growing pain and an injury. Make sure you outfit your kids with firm, supportive shoes.   Preventing Athletic Injuries The biggest issue for athletes is the overuse factor and not giving our bodies enough time to heal and rest. We also need to make that commitment to taking care of our bodies. At the professional athlete level, plenty of people have regular physical therapy routines where they keep their bodies optimized. I talk about “medical optimization,” which means you keep your body in the best shape you can because we put our bodies through more stress and strain than we probably give it credit for. I have friends in the NFL who get fined $1500-$2000 per ankle if they don’t have them taped before practice. Point being, they stress the importance of taking care of your body, and making that investment in yourself to keep your body in the best shape you can. Translating that into our own lives means that we make sure we’re wearing good shoes, utilizing orthotics to keep our feet and bodies well aligned, strengthening our ankles, using ankle braces if you’re playing basketball… doing specific things like that to cater to your body so you’re not going to push your body to the injury point. Do everything you can to prevent injury because once you’ve gone too far you’ll miss doing what you love. Plus, sometimes you could do damage that requires more than time away from competition, but perhaps even end up needing surgery.   Armchair Athlete Tips For the armchair athlete who plays in the turkey bowl once a year with friends, the biggest thing you can do is stretch and warm up beforehand. Also, make sure you’re wearing the right things: you’ve got to be in good quality and supportive shoes and wear ankle braces to give you the extra support you need because it’s all about injury prevention.   Foot and Ankle Surgeon Dr. Jordan MeyersDr. Jordan Meyers works in two offices for your convenience- Raleigh, NC (Blue Ridge) and Raleigh, NC (Millbrook). The information on this site is provided for your assistance only; this site does not provide podiatric advice. You should never diagnose or treat yourself for a podiatric condition based on the information provided herein, and the information is not provided for that purpose. Likewise, you should never determine that treatment is unnecessary based on this information. The information contained herein is not a substitute for podiatric care provided by a licensed podiatric professional. The information provided herein is not podiatric, medical or professional advice. This site does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Dr. Jordan Meyers and Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, related to any products offered for sale on this web site. Dr. Jordan Meyers and Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC further expressly disclaims any product warranties of effectiveness or fitness for any particular purpose or use. You are solely responsible for your use of, or reliance on, any products offered for sale herein, and any consequences arising out of such use or reliance. In no event will Dr. Jordan Meyers and Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC be liable for any damages resulting from use of or reliance on any such products, whether based on warranty, contract, tort or any other legal theory. This Website, and the information contained herein, is provided to you as a service for use at your sole risk.